9 Graphic Novels For People Who Have Never Read One

Culture

Graphic novels make a quick read and are a great way to devour a story with fewer words and breathtaking art. And no, graphic novels aren't just another name for superhero comics. They range from classic retellings to addicting new stories, so it's often not to difficult to find the perfect graphic novel for you. Whether you're trying to catch up on your reading challenge, searching for a light-hearted read or looking to get into the world of graphic novels, here are 9 handpicked graphic novels recommendations to get you into them if you haven’t already read one:

1) Heartstopper Series by Alice Oseman

Heartstopper is a very sweet, young adult contemporary LGBTQ+ romance graphic novel about two high school students, Charlie and Nick. They quickly become friends, and soon Charlie is falling hard for Nick, even though he doesn't think he has a chance. But love works in surprising ways, and sometimes good things are waiting just around the corner.

It started out as a passion project on Alice Oseman’s Tumblr and currently, there are three volumes out with the fourth book in the works.

2) Pumpkinheads by Rainbow Rowell and Faith Erin Hicks

Pumpkinheads comes from two of the most phenomenal contemporary romance writers. Pumpkinheads is a feel-good, fun book with wonderful artwork.

Deja and Josiah are seasonal friends who only see each other at the pumpkin patch where they work in the autumn. This year, are working their last shift together. But, this time, they decide to change things up.

They abandon their post at the Succotash Hut and go on an adventure around the pumpkin patch, eating s' mores, taking hayrides and getting lost in the maze-- all while searching for the girl who Josiah has been crushing on for years.

He's finally going to ask her out... if he can find the nerve! Pumpinkheads is the perfect book to get you into the autumn spirit all while making you feel giddy with the cute romance.

3) Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

Persepolis is a wise, funny, and heartbreaking memoir of Satrapi’s childhood in Iran during the Islamic Revolution

In incredible highly contrasting funny cartoon pictures, Satrapi recounts to a mind-blowing account in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the oust of the Shah's system, the victory of the Islamic Revolution, and the overwhelming impacts of war with Iraq. The canny and frank lone offspring of submitted Marxists and the incredible granddaughter of one of Iran's last sovereigns, Marjane gives testimony regarding a youth extraordinarily laced with the historical backdrop of her nation.

Seriously close to home, significantly political, and entirely unique, Persepolis is without a moment's delay an account of growing up and a token of the human expense of war and political constraint. What's more, at long last, it acquaints us with an overwhelming young lady with whom we can't resist the opportunity to begin to look all starry eyed at.

4) The Prince and The Dressmaker by Jen Wang

The Prince and The Dressmaker has a colorful, cute, and atmospheric art style. It takes place in 19th century France and has a slight fairytale vibe to it.

An absolutely adorable and fun read, Prince Sebastian's parents are looking for a bride for him all whilst Sebastian is too busy hiding his secret life from everyone. At night he puts on daring dresses and takes Paris by storm as his alter ego, the fabulous Lady Crystallia, the latest trendsetter in France and an absolute fashion icon.

Sebastian's secret weapon (and closest companion) is the splendid dressmaker, Frances―one of just two individuals who knows his reality. Be that as it may, Frances longs for significance, and being somebody's distinct advantage implies being a mystery. Until the end of time. How long would Frances be able to concede her fantasies to ensure a companion?

5) Through The Woods by Emily Carroll

Through The Woods is a compilation of five mysterious, spine-tingling stories that somehow involve the woods. The illustrations in this book are stunning and full of dark and striking colours. An unbelievable organic flow is created between the art.

This book keeps you awake at night and leaves you thinking about long after you finish it. Saying anything more would spoil the stories, so read it to find yourself in the middle of a Halloween movie become reality.

6) Nimona by Noelle Stevenson

What does this book not have? From dragons to symbolism, this graphic novel is brilliantly subversive, splendidly epic, and more. With solid, one of a kind characters, humor, and unprecedented art, Noelle Stevenson has given us an incredible story.

As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord blackheart have one mission: prove Sir Ambrosius Goldenlion and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren't the legends everyone thinks they are. But as small acts of mischief escalate into a vicious battle, Lord Blackheart quickly realizes that Nimona's powers are as murky and mysterious as her past.

And her unpredictable wild side might be more dangerous than he is willing to admit.

7) Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol

Ein meisterwerk!

A post shared by Vera Brosgol (@verabee) on

Vera Brosgol's debut is wonderfully entertaining with eye-catching art with a certain tone that transports you into the world of the book.

When Anya falls down a well, befriending a century-old ghost is not what she expected or imagined. But a friend might just be exactly what she needed in her life. Anya's Ghost tackles important topics like self-consciousness about the body, fitting in with the crowd in a light-hearted way. Readers have found the book spooky, sardonic, and secretly sincere.

This book might just become your favorite.

8) Amulet:The Stonekeeper by Kazy Kinuishi

Talking of great middle-grade graphic novels, The Amulet series has a creative world, charming characters, and an engaging storyline. It is a thrilling start to a series with an eye-catching art style. What else do we need in a graphic novel?

After, their father's death, Emily and Navin move into the mysterious and strange house of their mother's deceased great-grandfather. Not long after that, the house proves to be dangerous when a sinister creature lures their mother to the basement. Emily and Navim determined and desperate not to lose her too, follow her.

They enter the underground world which is inhabited by demons, robots and... talking animals? They quickly embark on a terrifying journey to face the most terrifying monster of all after befriending a small mechanical rabbit, Miskit.

This book has a lot more to it thank you realise and picking it up would be a decision you will never regret.

9) In Real Life by Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang

Jen Wang never fails to impress us and this book, full of gasp moments, and beautiful art style changing from page to page is one of her best works. A very interesting social issue is brought into the view while remaining a very light-hearted read.

Anda cherishes Coarsegold Online, the hugely multiplayer pretending game where she invests the vast majority of her free energy. It's where she can be a leader, a fighter, a hero. It's where she can meet individuals from everywhere throughout the world, and make friends.

Be that as it may, things become much increasingly confounded when Anda gets to know a gold farmer - a helpless Chinese child whose symbol in the game illegally gathers important articles and afterward sell them to players from developed countries with cash to consume. This conduct is carefully against the principles in Coarsegold, yet Anda before long comes to understand that inquiries of good and bad are significantly less clear when a real-life individual's genuine livelihood is in question.

A perfect book for you if you love to disappear in video games.

Whether you pick Hearstopper by Alice Oseman or Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, in a world of such fascinating graphic novels with eye-catching graphics, you will find the perfect graphic novel to introduce you to the vast world of graphic novels.

Me

Vama Suvani

Vama Suvani is a high school student whose interest lies in English literature and History. She writes articles and poems on a variety of topics relatable to teenagers. Vama loves to read books and documents her feelings on them in her Tumblr blog.


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